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Insider Index: This week in Salem, by the numbers

Here are 10 numbers that illustrate some of this week's big, and small, Oregon news stories.

Here are 10 numbers that illustrate some of this week's big, and small, Oregon news stories.

6: Members of Oregon's 7-member congressional delegation who support initiating an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.

49: Percent of registered voters who approve of impeachment inquiry, according to an NPR /PBS NewsHour / Marist poll released Thursday.

46: Percent of registered voters who do not. The margin of error on the poll was plus or minus 5 percentage points.

4: Child welfare directors the Oregon Department of Human Services has had since 2016. Rebecca Jones Gaston, the executive director of the Social Services Administration for the Maryland Department of Human Services, was named Oregon's new child welfare director this week.

$20 million: Amount Gov. Kate Brown has pledged in additional state funding — on top of an existing $20 million commitment — to bring the world track and field championships to Eugene in 2021, according to The Oregonian.

6: State employees, including two state troopers and four members of the Governor's Office, joining Brown on a trip to Doha, Qatar, for this year's championships, The Oregonian reports.

$81 million: Amount of money raised by taxes on recreational cannabis that has been sent to Oregon schools, enough to pay for 1,300 teachers, according to the Portland Business Journal. Oregon has a low tax rate on cannabis compared to other states that have legalized pot, and some economists think Oregon could charge more.

9.9%: Maximum amount your landlord can raise your rent in 2020, according to the Oregon Department of Administrative Services, which has calculated the first ever ceiling on rent increases per legislation passed this year.

40: Percent of Oregon agricultural exports that go overseas, according to The Associated Press.

$93 million: Approximate amount the Oregon Department of Forestry has failed to collect in money it's owed for fighting fires between 2015 and 2018, according to The Oregonian.